News items for tag english - Koos van den Hout

2019-09-19 Real IPv6 port scan/network mapping attempts 1 day ago
I noticed some interesting traffic in my home network this morning, an attempt at finding IPv6 systems. Since IPv6 privacy enhancements are enabled on most systems this is exactly like finding a needle in a haystack.

I noticed an amount of outgoing icmpv6 traffic, and looking at the destination addresses and the type of traffic found lots of 'unreachable route' messages to a few Chinese IPv6 addresses. Searching for the netblock '240e:f7:4f01:c' finds more reports of portscanning activity.
10:14:27.761704 IP6 (hlim 239, next-header TCP (6) payload length: 24) 240e:f7:4f01:c::3.12980 > 2001:980:14ca:1:5054:ff:feae:17.902: Flags [S], cksum 0xd0a9 (correct), seq 3726392987, win 29200, options [mss 1460], length 0
10:14:28.278108 IP6 (hlim 239, next-header TCP (6) payload length: 24) 240e:f7:4f01:c::3.19933 > 2001:980:14ca:1:5054:ff:feae:8003.12587: Flags [S], cksum 0xe1cc (correct), seq 95632679, win 29200, options [mss 1460], length 0
10:14:29.219766 IP6 (hlim 239, next-header TCP (6) payload length: 24) 240e:f7:4f01:c::3.41487 > 2001:980:14ca:1:5054:ff:feae:fff2.902: Flags [S], cksum 0x3c31 (correct), seq 500442149, win 29200, options [mss 1460], length 0
10:14:33.637405 IP6 (hlim 239, next-header TCP (6) payload length: 24) 240e:f7:4f01:c::3.35832 > 2001:980:14ca:1:5054:ff:feae:15.902: Flags [S], cksum 0xa6ea (correct), seq 2324914849, win 29200, options [mss 1460], length 0
10:14:34.468975 IP6 (hlim 239, next-header TCP (6) payload length: 24) 240e:f7:4f01:c::3.12470 > 2001:980:14ca:42::ffe8.16992: Flags [S], cksum 0x5a72 (correct), seq 3249792078, win 29200, options [mss 1460], length 0
10:14:34.469038 IP6 (flowlabel 0x63971, hlim 64, next-header ICMPv6 (58) payload length: 72) 2001:980:14ca:61::13 > 240e:f7:4f01:c::3: [icmp6 sum ok] ICMP6, destination unreachable, unreachable route 2001:980:14ca:42::ffe8
10:14:35.230776 IP6 (hlim 239, next-header TCP (6) payload length: 24) 240e:f7:4f01:c::3.63145 > 2001:980:14ca:1:20d:56ff:fece:8006.19: Flags [S], cksum 0xb87b (correct), seq 4259180220, win 29200, options [mss 1460], length 0
10:14:35.952841 IP6 (hlim 239, next-header TCP (6) payload length: 24) 240e:f7:4f01:c::3.9056 > 2001:980:14ca:42::8013.16992: Flags [S], cksum 0xbb3b (correct), seq 2896438720, win 29200, options [mss 1460], length 0
10:14:35.952880 IP6 (flowlabel 0x63971, hlim 64, next-header ICMPv6 (58) payload length: 72) 2001:980:14ca:61::13 > 240e:f7:4f01:c::3: [icmp6 sum ok] ICMP6, destination unreachable, unreachable route 2001:980:14ca:42::8013

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2019-09-14 The nanoKeyer morse keyer in its case 6 days ago
The nanoKeyer morsekeyer in case with paddles
The nanoKeyer morsekeyer in case
I found help at the radio club, Kees PA5Z made his metalworking skills available and now the nanoKeyer has a nice case and works fine in it.

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2019-09-11 First zone with valid DNSSEC signatures 1 week ago
My previous test with DNSSEC zone signing showed a problem with entropy in virtual machines. Today I had time to reboot the home server running the virtual machines including the virtual machine with the nameserver, based on bind9.

Now I can create DNSSEC signatures for zonefiles at high speed (0.028 seconds) with enough entropy available. My first test is with camp-wireless.com which is a domainname for redirecting to Camp Wireless but since that variant was mentioned somewhere I had to generate the redirects to the right version.

The next step was to upload the DS records for the zone to my registrar and get them entered into the top level domain. This failed on the first attempt, the DS records have to be entered very carefully at the registrar.

I tested the result with dnsviz for camp-wireless.com and found an error in the first try: I updated the serial after signing the zone. So the soa record wasn't signed correctly anymore.

I updated my zonefile Makefile to do the steps in the right order:
-zone-signedserial:
        named-checkzone $* $^
        ./SOA.pl $^
        dnssec-signzone -S -K /etc/bind/keys -g -a -r /dev/random -D -S -o $* $^
        rndc reload $*
        touch $@
For the zone camp-wireless.com the original data is in camp-wireless.com-zone, the DNSSEC signatures in camp-wireless.com-zone.signed. And make will abort when one of the commands gives an error level, so it will for example stop completely when I make a typo in the zonefile which will make named-checkzone fail. The -D option creates a file to be used with $INCLUDE in the original zonefile. This does create a circular dependency: named-checkzone will fail when the -signedserial file isn't available on the first run. So the first run will have to be manually.

So now the zone is signed correctly. The next developments will be to find out how to monitor this extensively so I won't be surprised by problems and to redo the signing from time to time to make DNSSEC zone walking very hard.

And when I trust all of this I will implement it on other domain names that I manage.
Read the rest of First zone with valid DNSSEC signatures

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2019-09-08 A thumbs up for robust scripts 1 week ago
Encrypt all the things meme Today some of the letsencrypt certificates were older than 60 days, so the renewal script started to kick in. Last year I completely automated the certificate renewal of letsencrypt certificates with dehydrated and wrote some scripts around the renewal process with hopefully enough error handling.

Today some of the error handling got tested, one renewal gave an error:
  + ERROR: An error occurred while sending post-request to https://acme-v02.api.letsencrypt.org/acme/new-order (Status 500)
And indeed the dehydrated script gave an error level, the resulting (empty!) .crt file wasn't copied and nothing happened. On the next run of the renewal script this certificate will still be older than 60 days and therefore the renewal will be tried again.

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2019-09-06 The morse keyer is working with cqrlog 2 weeks ago
Next step was linking the morse keyer with the Linux radio logging and operating software cqrlog. A simple search gave me Nanokeyer with cqrlog - CQRLOG and indeed the suggested option 'WinKeyer USB' works. The option 'K3NG keyer' always stopped after a few characters of morse.

Now to get other software like fldigi and tlf working. And not have conflicts with both of them running.

Update: In the tlf manual I found a link to N0NB/winkeydaemon on github which works great too. I changed the default port /dev/ttyUSB0 to /dev/ttywinkey because USB0 is where my radio CAT control usually ends up, and two applications trying to use that serial port confuses the radio. The /dev/ttywinkey link is maintained by udev, with a rule in /etc/udev/rules.d/99-usb-serial.rules :
SUBSYSTEM=="tty", ATTRS{idVendor}=="1a86", ATTRS{idProduct}=="7523", SYMLINK+="ttywinkey"
I can't select on a serial number or anything more specific so devices with a QinHeng Electronics HL-340 USB-Serial adapter will probably all try to get a symlink to /dev/winkeyer.

I tested the result with cqrlog (selecting the cwdaemon option in cqrlog cw settings) and it works fine too. Next step will be to test with tlf.

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2019-09-06 The morse keyer is working 2 weeks ago
nanoKeyer morse keyer and morse paddle key
The nanoKeyer and the morse paddle key. Connections to the nanoKeyer from left to right: cw to radio, input from paddle and usb to the computer
After a few hours of thoroughly soldering and checking the results the nanoKeyer is done. I did find an error in my work so I had to get out the desoldering iron to fix it: I put the wrong resistor in one place.

Next step was to get the arduino that is the core of the nanoKeyer tested. There was an arduino nano included with the kit preprogrammed with the nanoKeyer software, but it still needed the print headers soldered: two rows of 15 pins and very secure soldering work. I did put the small tip on my soldering station for this work and used a magnifying glass to check my results. It seemed to work fine but I noticed soon the speed control potentiometer and the menu buttons gave no response. Both those functions use an analog input of the Arduino in the nanoKeyer. I had bought an arduino at a previous radio parts market so I tried that one. This one already had the print headers installed so there was less chance of causing a defect.

That one had to be programmed first, so I dove into getting the Arduino integrated development environment installed. After a few tries it seemed the only way to have working USB communications is to run the whole Arduino IDE as root (using sudo). Not very secure but at least I could continue my work. The right settings were made according to the nanoKeyer Firmware Upload Guide 2 and the Arduino nano I bought myself works fine. The result: sending morse code, changing settings with the menu button all worked fine.

The ultimate step was to get software controlled CW generation working. I soon found Winkey USB works in Linux - OK1RR which has a driver binary (no source unfortunately) which communicates fine with the nanoKeyer. The network UDP protocol is somewhat very binary so I used one of the cwdaemon test programs to get actual morse code sent from the computer.

Now for the (for me) hard part: making the right holes in the case. I'll try to find some help at my radio club.

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2019-09-04 New electronics project: a morse keyer 2 weeks ago
My learning morse is still ongoing and I'm taking the first steps in generating morse. I decided on a paddle as a first morse key to get the dot/dash (or better: Dit and Dah) timing correct automatically. Opinions on tbe best choice for first morse key differ: some say a straight key is the best, others say a paddle. I'm sticking with the paddle at the moment because I also have a tendency to develop RSI. Telegraph operators were the first profession to have cases of RSI so I hope to avoid that.

I recently bought a paddle: the uniHam UNI-730a which is a nice affordable paddle for a starting morse operator. With the built-in keyer in my Yaesu FT-857 radio it is possible to create good morse code. I use the option to create the morse tone on the radio without transmitting to practise sending morse. I check the results with the Android application Rx Morse.

But, I want to be able to participate in morse contests in the future. For those a cw keyer is necessary that can be controlled both from a paddle (or a straight key) and the computer. I was looking at options when a fellow club member mentioned he had a nanoKeyer morse keyer kit available that he wasn't going to build himself because his radio can do all that work. So I bought the kit from him, including case and I'm soldering the first parts.

Since all parts are through-hole, I am soldering with the components 'hanging' from the board. I want all components to be as close to the printed circuit board as possible so for some things that want to 'fall' I use rubber bands to make them stay close to the board for the first soldering connections. I do avoid warming up the rubber bands, they will probably break and/or burn causing a nasty smell.

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2019-09-03 Back from holiday in Austria 2 weeks ago
Flag of Austria, cc-by-2.0 license James Cridland
Flag of Austria, cc-by-2.0 license James Cridland
We went on our summer holiday to the Montafon area in the Voralberg province of Austria. This is an area that can be reached within one day of driving.

We went camping and stayed at the Aktivcamping Montafon in Schruns-Tschagguns. This is one valley away from the campsite we visited in the Summer of 2018.

Activities included lots of walks in the mountains and a few "klettersteig" (also known as "via ferrata") routes. I tried climbing and abseiling with the right equipment last year and learned that it's something I can do.

We did a three day tour of mountain huts (sleeping in those huts for two nights). Staying in mountain huts makes more remote areas reachable.

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2019-08-26 3000 items on my homepage and counting 3 weeks ago
Over 3000 items I was just wondering about the number of newsitems on my homepage and did a check. An interesting value popped up: 3000.

Yes, a round 3000 items since I started writing more than 20 years ago: I've created a virtual bookcase with an overview of books I like/read.

Graphic created with Retro Wave.

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2019-08-21 Comparing yfktest and tlf for linux-based amateur radio contesting 1 month ago
Episode 295 of Linux in the Ham Shack is about the TLF Contest Logger. I wrote to Linux in the Ham Shack about my experiences with both programs. In 2017 I participated in the IARU-HF contest using yfktest and in 2019 I participated in the IARU-HF contest using TLF.
My opionion about both is clearly formed by my style of contesting. Phone contesting is rare for me, and I am a very casual contester. I operate in search and pounce mode, where I search for other stations calling CQ.

My experiences:

Both are textmode programs, which try to mimic DOS-based contest programs. No dragging around windows, you'll have to deal with how the makers decided to set up the screen. Also, on a graphical system, try to find the biggest and baddest monospace font to fill as much of your screen with the contesting software as possible.

The role of contest logging software is making it easier to log contacts in a contest. It does this by automating a lot of the tasks in a CW contest, by keeping the log and showing the outgoing serial number (if needed). It's a plus when contest logger can keep the live claimed score in the contest and when it can connect to a DX-cluster and show possible contacts being spotted. Both packages can do the basic contesting and scorekeeping, tlf is the only one that supports DX clusters

yfktest is written in Perl, tlf in C. For adding a new contest to yfktest you will soon have to do some programming in perl to handle the score calculations. For a new contest in tlf you may have to do some C programming.

yfktest has no cluster support, but tlf does have it. This is a huge difference to me. With tlf I could open a cluster window showing me where new calls were spotted and on what frequencies recent contacts were, so I could hunt for interesting new calls and multipliers

Specific to the IARU-HF contest and my use of the packages: yfktest supports the IARU-HF contest out of the box, so it gets the multipliers right. When I did the IARU-HF contest with tlf, I asked about it on the list and someone shared a configuration right at the beginning of the contest so it worked. Mostly: It did not count the multipliers correctly, so I had no idea of the claimed score during the contest.

Both are open source and welcome any additions. Looking at the commit history tlf is somewhat more active recently.

If you want to really add a contest to either of them you'll probably have to start thinking about that months before the contest and take your time to debug your rules/scoring configuration if you want good scoring during the contest.

I will probably stick with tlf because of the cluster support.
Linux in the Ham Shack took my shallow dive a lot further and went into a deep dive with installing, configuring and running TLF. Awesome episode, I really enjoyed it!

Links to all the stuff: Show Notes #295: TLF Contest Logger Deep Dive - Linux in the Ham Shack
yfktest linux based ham radio contest logger, TLF, a linux based ham radio contest logger.

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2019-08-13 Decompiling zonefiles 1 month ago
The authoritive nameserver on the homeserver 2017 is using bind9 version 9.10.3 (from Devuan packages). I wanted to look up something in a secondary zonefile and noticed it was a binary file.

Using 'file' to determine what to do next wasn't much help:
$ file secondary.domain-zone
secondary.domain-zone: data
But a search found an explanation at Reading a binary zone file from Bind - The Linux Page. With named-compilezone a zonefile can be 'uncompiled' to a readable file.
$ /usr/sbin/named-compilezone -f raw -F text -o /tmp/secondary.domain-zone.txt secondary.domain secondary.domain-zone
zone secondary.domain/IN: loaded serial 2018122523
dump zone to /tmp/secondary.domain-zone.txt...done
OK
$ file /tmp/secondary.domain-zone.txt
/tmp/secondary.domain-zone.txt: ASCII text
Which is a readable zonefile.

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2019-08-05 Time for a new plot of the number of radio contacts 1 month ago
QSO count plot up to July 2019 Time for a new plot of the number of radio contacts. Months with contest(s) stand out again as they elevate the number of contacts. In July 2019 I participated in the DL-DX RTTY Contest 2019 and the IARU-HF Championship 2019. That last one has added a few countries to my list of countries confirmed in phone modes.

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2019-08-01 IPv6 growing up: ssh attempts to an inside machine 1 month ago
IPv6 is growing up: I saw an ssh attempt to an inside machine, reachable only via IPv6. The source was a Chinese IPv6 address which had not tried anything on any other public service.
Jul 30 18:39:02 ritchie sshd[27454]: Bad protocol version identification '\026\003\001' from 240e:d9:d800:200::212 port 44926

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2019-07-29 Tried receiving ISS SSTV with the FUNcube Dongle Pro+ 1 month ago
This evening had scheduled Amateur Radio on the International Space Station slow-scan TV transmissions so I took Arrow antenna, the new FUNcube Dongle Pro+, cables and laptop outside.

I found out gqrx crashes when the dongle is on the righthandside USB port of the laptop, so that one is out. On the backside port everything was working, and audio routing worked routing the analog output audio (created by qgrx) to the recording by audacity and the image decoding with qsstv. Gpredict was set up to control the reception frequency in gqrx, and this whole setup was working ok.

But the signal from the ISS looked very very weak in gqrx, just a small rise in level above the noise when I pointed at the general direction of the ISS. No idea why. No images were decoded from it.

After the pass I tried receiving some other sources with this setup and receiving the PI2NOS repeater went fine. But that's on the 70 centimeters band. I saw no activity on PI3UTR which would have enabled a test on 2 meters.

This needs more testing. Maybe something to hold the antenna cables so they don't get pulled from the laptop/radio during a pass.

Update: Most likely culprit: interference in the 2 meter amateur band. With a handheld radio that has received ISS packet sounds before I could now only hear them very faint in the noise. The local 2 meter noise is killing weak signal reception.

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2019-07-26 My Android phone gets an IPv6 address from t-mobile... but no routing 1 month ago
I just noticed in Network Info II that my android phone does get an IPv6 address from t-mobile. The address is something like 2a02:498:1fe1:9a02:2:3:xxxx:xxxx which is indeed in IPv6 address space allocated to T-Mobile Netherlands.
% Information related to '2a02:498::/29'

inet6num:       2a02:498::/29
netname:        NL-T-MOBILE-20080609
country:        NL
So I tested directly whether I could make an IPv6 connection to my website, but it fell back to IPv4. Network Info II saw no IPv6 route on the phone, but in later checking I also saw no IPv6 route when connected to the wifi at home, where IPv6 works fine. And doing a traceroute to that address from home shows that a core router at xs4all says network unreachable:
 3  0.ae22.xr4.1d12.xs4all.net (2001:888:1:4032::1)  6.105 ms !N  6.063 ms !N *
So T-Mobile has activated some IPv6 address management in their network, but stopped at that point.

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2019-07-25 First onewire stats ageing out 1 month ago
I was looking at some onewire temperature stats and noticed the first stats being aged out. I started monitoring temperatures with 1-wire sensors in January 2007 using rrdtool. I set up round robin archives with an expiry in 11 years, and those 11 years have passed now for the first measurements.

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2019-07-21 BrewDog Indie Pale Ale 2 months ago
Another random find in the 'special beers' rack in the local supermarket. I usually like IPA beers, so this one sounded good to me.

Not as strong a taste as I would expect from an IPA. The influence of hop is just a mere touch, not as strong as some other IPA beers. On the grand scale of beers it's a tasty but not too complex.

The beer details

CompanyBrewDog
Beer nameIndie Pale Ale
Beer styleIPA - India Pale Ale
Alcohol by volume4.2 %

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2019-07-20 Going full duplex with amateur satellites, part 14: Switch to FUNcube Dongle Pro+ 2 months ago
FUNcube Dongle Pro+ I saw a radio amateur offering a secondhand FUNcube Dongle Pro+ for a very reasonable price and remembered my work to get into linear satellites and the problems with the input filtering on an rtl-sdr while transmitting. So I checked the specifications for that dongle and saw a lot better filtering.

I decided to go for it and a few mails later the dongle was on the way to my letterbox. Literally, as it fitted in a small package that could be delivered in the letterbox. With tracking, so I received a notification from the package tracker app after the mailman put it in the letterbox.

There is good support for the FUNcube dongle Pro+ in gqrx so I tried that first. It does give some USB errors:
[46918.612090] usb 2-1: new full-speed USB device number 10 using xhci_hcd
[46918.762268] usb 2-1: New USB device found, idVendor=04d8, idProduct=fb31
[46918.762273] usb 2-1: New USB device strings: Mfr=1, Product=2, SerialNumber=0
[46918.762276] usb 2-1: Product: FUNcube Dongle V2.0  
[46918.762278] usb 2-1: Manufacturer: Hanlincrest Ltd.         
[46918.797477] usb 2-1: 1:1: cannot get freq at ep 0x81
[46918.803092] hid-generic 0003:04D8:FB31.0003: hiddev0,hidraw0: USB HID v1.11 Device [Hanlincrest Ltd.          FUNcube Dongle V2.0  ] on usb-0000:00:14.0-1/input2
[46918.917284] usb 2-1: 1:1: cannot get freq at ep 0x81
[46918.955162] usb 2-1: 1:1: cannot get freq at ep 0x81
It does show as a valid device in gqrx and I was soon decoding audio with it. The easiest decoding was in the VHF II FM broadcast band. After all the work with the 2 MHz wide spectrum from the rtl-sdr it takes a bit of adjusting to start working with 192 kHz spectrum from the FUNcube dongle but qgrx moves that bit nicely when needed.

To the computer, the dongle is an USB device with two subfunctions: an usbaudio device and a usbhid device. The audio device is used to deliver sampled radio spectrum and the hid device is used to control the dongle. This is why it's relatively easy to use softwarewise: modern operating systems have usbaudio support and usb hid control from a user application isn't too hard either.

One of the things I do want is a lot of interesting audio routing to be able to record both the downlink audio and my own audio. So I fired up pavucontrol and gqrx crashed. Restarting gqrx did not work until I closed pavucontrol. Some searching found gqrx crash with Funcube Pro+ which suggests to turn the device off for PulseAudio. Which may seem strange but PulseAudio is also using the alsa drivers which gqrx tries to use. I guess there is some conflict between gqrx and PulseAudio in dealing with the alsa drivers. After switching the FUNcube Dongle Pro+ in PulseAudio I could open the dongle in gqrx and play with audio settings for other channels in pavucontrol.

The setup with gpredict controlling the receive frequency of gqrx also worked fine, so this is looking good. Now to find out how things work on an FM or linear satellite.

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2019-07-15 Still SMTP floods from 185.222.211.x addresses 2 months ago
Cybercriminal A month later I'm still seeing SMTP floods from 185.222.211.11 and adjacent addresses. I activated the sendmail-reject filter ruleset in fail2ban which keeps several addresses in that range blocked most of the time.

Given reports like 185.222.211.238 | Cloud Core LP | AbuseIPDB and 185.222.211.243 | Cloud Core LP | AbuseIPDB I'm not the only one seeing abuse from this range.

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2019-07-14 I participated in the IARU-HF championship 2019 2 months ago
This weekend I participated in the IARU HF Championship and made a nice number of contacts given the available time in which I could call out my callsign. Before the contest the radio propagation was a bit dissapointing and I did most of my preparation at the very last minute.

For the contest logging I used the TLF linux contest logger which does not support the IARU HF Championship out of the box. But someone posted about this contest to the TLF development mailing list and shared the configuration and initial exchange list, so it was minimal work to get going. With this configuration TLF worked as a logger, it just didn't calculate the multipliers in the contest correctly.

In the end I made 95 contacts, which is a nice improvement over the previous time I participated in this contest: IARU HF Championship PE4KH 2017. Of the 95 contacts, 19 were on the 40 meter band (Saturday evening) and 76 on the 20 meter band (Saturday afternoon and Sunday morning).

I did not participate in the 2018 edition because it was the weekend we left for our summer holiday. The 2018 IARU HF championship was also the World Radio Team Championship 2018 so I missed the chance to work one of those stations. I did follow the whole preparation for the WRTC 2018 and had a look at the developments in the scores during that weekend.

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, reachable as koos+website@idefix.net. PGP encrypted e-mail preferred.

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Other webprojects: Camp Wireless, wireless Internet access at campsites, The Virtual Bookcase, book reviews